Camp Laurel Blog

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That’s So Camp!

According to the American Camp Association, there are about 8,400 overnight camps in the United States. With that many camps, there are obviously numerous differences between one camp and the next. Some camps have lakes while others have a pool; there are full season, 7-week camps and there are multi-session camps. The list of differences could go on forever, but while all camps are different, there are certain aspects that stay the same. These aspects are “perennially camp” and are the reason that summer camp is so important to those who attend. Without these staples, camp just wouldn’t be the same!

Campfires and S’mores

When people think about camp, one of the first things that come to mind is a campfire…and no campfire is complete without s’mores! But campfires and s’mores represent way more than just a mellow night with a delicious treat — they represent bringing people together. At any campfire, campers are surrounded by friends and counselors. There is no need for television, phones or technology of any kind. Instead campers enjoy each other’s company. There is a quaint and quiet simplicity that in today’s world is very hard to find.

Songs and Spirit

If campfires and s’mores are the first thing that comes to mind when people think about camp, songs and spirit are a close second. And similarly to campfires and s’mores, songs and spirit are about bringing people together. The unity that is formed from learning a camp song or from having pride in your camp is unmatched. This unity is not the only benefit of the songs and spirit of camp; they also instill a sense of tradition in campers. Many of the songs sung at camp have been around for decades. They are a great way to connect current campers to alumni and form a bond between generations who might not have had anything in common otherwise.

Campfires and s’mores may bring people together, and songs and spirit may keep traditions alive, but ultimately camp would not be camp without positive energy. No matter what camp you attend, the amount of support, love and camaraderie is unlike anywhere else in the world. While all camps differ for various reasons, perennially camp traditions are alive everywhere.

In With a Bang….

Week #2 started with a bang – the biggest Fireworks display in all of south central Maine over Echo Lake. Along with Camps Vega and Winnebago, we lit up the night sky with a spectacular display of pageantry and fun! It was an incredible night of fireworks, 3-D glasses and bomb pop ice cream on the shores of Echo Lake.

And with the bang of fireworks came Intercamps and trips, which are in full swing this week. In the athletics world our boys are competing with Manitou, Androscoggin, Caribou, All Star and Winnebago…while our girls are competing with Vega, Matoaka and All Star in the Central Maine Girls Camp League. Meanwhile in adventure we’ve hiked at Bradbury State Park and Three Rocks and in ChefCamp, Chef Isabelle and our campers are creating masterpieces and incredible delicacies every day. We also had our first camper Talent Show last night (to rave reviews from the packed house and crowd) and tomorrow is our first Out of Camp S-Day with trips to Fun Town, Aquaboggin, Boothbay, Old Port and Splashtown. To round off the week we’ll have Sports Night Thursday Night under-the-lights and our all camp Council Fire Friday Night.

We are running full steam ahead – and life is great in 04355!Trevor Currie-58

Hard To Believe

It’s hard to believe that tomorrow we’ll have been at camp for a week already. The time has flown. In that short period, we’ve played, swam, skied, spun, climbed, hiked, sailed and fished. We’ve fully reacquainted with old friends and made new ones. We’ve bonded with Counselors, Campus Leaders and Department Heads. But mostly, we’ve become comfortable in our own space and have settled in for the great ride of camp.
detailWe haven’t had an ounce of rain during the day — it’s been sunny and beautiful for all daytime activities and cooled down a bit at night. It’s now already time to take a minute to slow down. We’ve been hydrating all day and at all meals…fresh fruit at morning Fruit Break…Powerade at Rest Hour…water or milk at Nite Bite — and staying ahead so we can keep our energy up.

In addition to the great daily programming, our special events team has started to sprinkle in the “fun” part of camp as well. Quest, S Days, Talent Shows, Campfires, Sports Nite and so much more.  We’re ready for Week #2!!

Sunset at Camp

Camp provides the perfect backdrop to a sunset. Watching the sun dip below the tree line and catch the reflection of the water before finally disappearing into the horizon as the campus slowly lights up isn’t just a classic picturesque image of camp, it’s symbolic. It signals a shift in the camp day. The daily activities have ended and now it’s time for the evening to begin.

Sunset at camp signifies dinner. Dinner is an important activity at summer camp. It’s a time for everyone to come together and tell stories about their day as they share a meal as the daylight slowly transitions into a star filled night.

With the sunset also comes campfires. Each camp has its own unique campfire traditions. But the one thing they all have in common is that campfires happen after the sun goes down. Whether it’s entertaining each other, singing songs or eating s’mores, sitting around a campfire at night helps everyone tune into the environment around them and take in the magic of summer camp. The sounds of campus become more amplified. The smells become more distinct.

Campers and staff alike also know when they see the sun begin to set that it’s almost time for evening activities. Evening activities are some of the most action-packed and anticipated moments at camp. Sometimes the entire camp participates in evening activities together while at others separate activities are held for different age groups.

It’s so easy to not even notice the sunset during the ten months when one is not at summer camp. But at camp, sunset is something that just can’t be missed. Not only is it an important part of the camp day, it’s nice to take notice of such a beautiful transition and to understand that taking notice of it is a special part of camp.

While You’re Waiting until June…

So, the summer of 2014 is still a L-O-N-G 8 months away. But here are a few things to keep you warm during the colder months of the year…

1.) Opening Day. Is there any better feeling than that moment the bus pulls up to camp, you step off and are immediately tackled by a herd of camp friends who have waited all year to see you?

2.) Campfires. Every camp has its own version. In fact, your camp’s campfire is a big part of what makes it your camp. You’re sure of two things: A) Your camp’s campfire is the best B) S’mores taste best when made at your camp’s campfire.

3.) Sing-alongs. It’s amazing how much singing silly songs arm-in-arm with your camp friends during the summer makes you feel. Admit it. You find yourself singing to yourself throughout the winter. Your school friends catch you. You want to explain. ‘It’s a camp thing,’ you say. You immediately send a Vine to all of your camp friends of you singing – and doing motions to –your favorite camp songs.

4.) Arts & Crafts. Seriously, you can tie-dye at home too…really.

5.) The official camp video, yearbook, or seasonal newsletter. It should be showing up in your mailbox anytime now. Host a party. Reminisce about this past summer. Know that next summer will be here before you know it. Set goals now. Next summer will be epic.

6.) Camp Shows. Thespians and camp go hand-in-hand. It’s no coincidence that a lot of the biggest names in Hollywood are summer camp alumni.

7.) Boats. Camp has lots of boats. Ski boats, sailboats, hobie cats, kayaks, canoes…Whichever is your choice, one fact hails true: some of the best moments of the summer happen on the water.

8.) Trips. Are the movies at home ever as good as it is when you’re enjoying it with your camp friends? What about a roller coasters? Didn’t think so.

9.) Camp food. Admit it. You live for S Day Breakfasts.

10.) Cabin mates. When you come home with something exciting to share during the winter, who do you share it with?

End of Summer

It’s hard to believe another summer at Camp Laurel has nearly come and gone, but here we are. In just a few weeks, the camp season of 2013 will be a memory and school buses will once again be a regular sight around many neighborhoods. There is always a feeling around camp at the end of the summer that someone pushed a fast-forward button. Right about now, campers and staff begin reflecting on where the time has gone. But something happens in that reflection; they remember EVERYTHING they did over the summer.

Moments at camp happen so fast. The days are packed full of adventure. When campers and staff begin to inventory their summer memories, they’re often in awe of the amount of things they achieved in such a short period of time. In retrospect, the summer seems endless. There were the big adventures; trips, all camp events, campfires, shows, performances, leagues, College Days. There were the daily activities; swimming, playing sports, arts and crafts, theater, nature, fishing, etc. Those are the memories that seem to make the summer go on forever. Then there were the moments and events that stick out as really special; being with friends, creating that special craft project, riding a zipline for the first time, hitting a bullseye in archery, making a foul shot in basketball, getting up on waterskis. Those are the memories that freeze time. They’re the ones that make the summer of 2013, “Summer 2013” in hearts and memories. Those are the moments behind teary goodbyes, repeated camp stories, and the countdown for next year. Memories are a great dessert after a filling summer, and like every great dessert, everyone wants more.

Create a Camp Atmosphere All Year Long

Just because your children are no longer at camp doesn’t mean you can’t create a camp atmosphere in your home. There are several things you can do to keep the camp spirit alive all year long.

This doesn’t have to be a radical flip of the switch that completely eliminates conveniences and luxuries from your lives. In fact, such an act is probably not very realistic for many families. But taking small steps to reduce your children’s reliance on things such as television, video games, and cell phones is a great way to remind them that don’t need them as much as they think they do. Designate a day or two each week in which you won’t turn on the television or play video games. Have a family game night instead. Board games and card games are a great, light-hearted way to bring the entire family together for a few hours. Turn off cell phones during meal times, before a designated time in the morning, and after a designated time in the evening. Yes, with the invention of smart phones, we’re becoming increasingly reliant on these convenient little gadgets, but you may be surprised at just how much you enjoy the peace and quiet of a few hours without them each day…and, your family will also likely remember just how much they appreciate having a conversation with someone who is not looking at their cell phone or texting the entire time.

Keep supplies for creative bursts. Arts & Crafts, Eco Science, and Nature don’t have to be activities restricted to the camp setting. In fact, many of the projects that your children do at camp can quite easily be done at home, and they’re a great way to fill an afternoon or evening on which you’ve decided to have a break from television and video games. There are books readily available that walk you step-by-step through such popular camp projects as tie-dying, candle making, beading, shrinky dinks, Mentos geysers, goo, and many more. YouTube also has a host of videos that demonstrate kid friendly home science and nature experiments. Keeping a closet or a chest of standard supplies for these types of projects will prevent you from having to make a shopping trip every time the kids want to have some summer camp style fun.

Have a “campfire”. You might not have a backyard big enough (and there may be some local ordinances against this, even if you do), but consider having a backyard fire. A patio fire pit, if you have one, is actually ideal. An operable indoor fireplace works, too. Make s’mores, tell stories, share memories. This makes for a great evening to invite friends over because, as every camper will tell you, the more the merrier at a campfire. If you live in an area in which weather permits, actually taking a weekend camping trip is always fun, too.

Start a garden (if you have a yard) or cook with your children once a week. Gardening and cooking programs are popular at camp. Even if you don’t have the space in your yard, herb gardens are easy to maintain and can be grown indoors. Besides being enjoyable and fun, cooking is a valuable life skill for children to learn. Let your children look up healthy recipes, talk about nutrition with them, and, most importantly, let them do the work in the kitchen.

Have regular family “out of the house” trips. At camp, children regularly take “out of camp” trips to places such as local sporting events, the movies, or bowling… They look forward to these trips as a special treat and time to create some very special memories with their camp friends. Why not make special memories like these as a family?

By making just a few (fun) adjustments, your entire family can enjoy the spirit of camp throughout the year, and it just might make those ten months of waiting a little more bearable for the kids!

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